Confessions

Emme Bozone Photo    By Emme

Confession: I love reading almost as much as I love coffee. There is something about getting lost in a story, being challenged to think a new way, and learning about an issue I once was clueless to. Reading keeps me sane; reminding me there is a world beyond the walls of the classroom, the list of homework assignments, and clients to see.

With the cool air comes a longing to curl up with a hot cup of tea, and a good book. To help you get started, here are some of the books I’ve enjoyed, in no particular order.

Just Mercy- A Story of Justice and Redemption by Bryan Stevenson
Bryan Stevenson was a law student when he took an internship with a non-profit law firm that represented inmates on death row. This internship became his passion in life. After graduating, he returned to the firm before relocating to Alabama to found the Equal Justice Initiative (EJI). Representing the innocent, inadequately represented, survivors, children, and mentally ill on death row, Stevenson has made it is life calling to find justice for all. The book chronicles the history of death row, stories of inmates, and laws. It reads like a novel, rather then a textbook and exposes our nations deep roots of racial injustice that are still alive today.

Teaching with Poverty in Mind by Eric Jensen
Research has shown the adverse affects poverty has an individual at any age, but have you ever considered how schools react to it is also a major player in how students will adapt? Students spend a majority of their day at school, surrounded by peers and teachers, in a setting that should theoretically be enriching their life. Jensen takes a look at how schools currently respond to poverty, what research shows, and how schools can help bridge the gap. A must read for any social worker as he intertwines micro and macro issues and change to demonstrate the importance of a well-connected team.

When Helping Hurts by Steven Corbett
To be honest, I read this book for the first time three years ago as I was preparing to spend a summer in Malawi and Zambia as a youth ministry intern. This semester I pulled it out and re-read it as I started my field placement. I credit this book to be a major part of how I came to understand social injustice, the effects of philanthropy, and empowerment. Written from the perspective of the Christian theology, it gives insight into the world of non-profits and social service agencies and the impact of different types of service.

Is Everyone Hanging Out without Me? (And other concerns) by Mindy Kaling
This is possibly my favorite book I’ve read this semester! Every time I picked up the book I was either laughing, identifying with her story on some level, or both. As a collection of short stories about her adult life, Kaling recaps some of her most trying times in life, integrating humor, life lessons and bits of wisdom. I finished this book in three days and am ready to read it again!

So what’s next on my list?
– Gray Mountain by John Grisham
– Rising Strong by Brene Brown
– All the Light We Cannot See by Anthony Doerr

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