Emme Bozone Photo

By Emme

Every student has dreams and expectations when they enter school. I remember the first few weeks of school; classes were filled with chatter about what we dreamed of using our degree for. We had our dreams, but professors and second year students cautioned us to not get caught up in them. As we got further into the semester we became antsy to find out where we would be spending time training to be a social worker.

The day finally came! It felt a bit like the first day school again. There was so much unknown, yet a sense of certainty. For the past ten years I have worked with children, and figured I would get a field placement working with them in some capacity. My dream is to work with children in an educational setting.

The excitement of finding out my placement rapidly deflated. My placement was working at Interfaith Ministries in the Meals on Wheels department. I was so upset that I had to spend my first internship working with the geriatric population, one of the few populations I had never dreamed of working with.

As we finish our first semester, I cannot begin to express how grateful I am to have been pushed out of my comfort zone. Working with a different population has given me the ability to learn new skills, view social work from a new perspective, and discover new things about yourself.

We often ask our clients to try something new, to reframe their situation, or to think in a different way. As a social work intern, I had to do the same thing. If I had not opened my mind to the possibilities of what social work can do with different populations, I would have been stuck. Instead I’m learning about Meals on Wheels, the clients we serve, the many agencies in Houston, and how to help seniors live independently for as long as possible.

I would have never picked Interfaith Ministries, but I am glad it was picked for me. Graduate school brings about a lot of uncertainty, but there is a lot to learn when you trust in the process. You may not get the class you want or the field placement you dream of, but when you trust in the process you grow as a person, as a social worker, and a colleague.

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