Dixie blog2013 picBy Dixie

This semester I’m taking global justice, taught by Jody Williams, and during the first class she talked about ‘righteous indignation’ and the difference between it and anger. Righteous indignation is a form of anger but in its essence, is a sense of mistreatment or injustice.

I instantly identified with those two words. I think mostly because I’m quickly becoming that friend/date/family member that talks about the (insert: terrible injustice) in (insert: community) with the passion most reserve for talking about Texas football. Yep, I’m that girl.

Most of the time my ‘righteous indignation’ is met with uncomfortable laughs, and eye rolls but when I walk into the GCSW all that changes. I’m surrounded by brilliant and passionate people that have not only identified what makes them ‘righteously indignant’ but are doing something about it. Gone are the uncomfortable laughs, eye rolls and complacency with the status quo. It’s comforting and terrifying all at once to have such a passionate study body. A student body that challenges you to ask “why” when it’s really tough to do and to speak out against social injustice when no one else will.

Although my second year is off and running with very little time to do anything but check the next assignment, reading or task off my ‘to do’ list, there are several projects that I am finding myself dedicating more and more time to this semester. With the help of a group of fantastic classmates I’m learning how to hone what makes me ‘righteously indignant.’

My advice to you is take advantage of this as a GCSW student. I love what my friend and classmate, Sara, said in a previous post about being a social worker and GCSW student. “Every social worker I have met, at the GCSW and beyond, is filled with so much passion and is intrinsically supportive. We help each other, learn from each other, enjoy each other’s company, celebrate each other’s success and support each other in times of need.”

In my experience, at the GCSW this is absolutely true and without the “righteous indignation’ of my colleagues and their help in cultivating my own, my MSW experience would be vastly different.

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